Most famous sacred temples and pagodas in South-East of Asia

Most famous sacred temples and pagodas in South-East of Asia


According to Vietnamese beliefs, worshiping with sincerity on the first days of the lunar new year is a great way to start a new year of luck and peace. In this article, Hamid, would like to share with you the most famous sacred temples and pagodas in South-East of Asia.

Kyaikhtiyo: Worship at the golden rock temple in Myanmar

For pilgrims, the Golden Rock Temple, also known as Kyakhtiyo in Mon state, is one of the best places to travel in Myanmar. It is said that the Kyakhtiyo temple was built when Buddhe was still alive, about more than 2500 years ago. Kyakhtiyo is not only one of the oldest and most famous temples in Myanmar but also an unparalleled heritage site in the world. The itinerary is challenging yet worth your while as you can see the sacred stones hovering on the rocks. The stone is covered by thin plates of gold and hung with only one stand of Buddha’s hair.

Direction to Kyakhtiyo temple: 210km from the former capital Yangon – ➝ book Luxury tours Myanmar

Kyaikhtiyo: Worship at the golden rock temple in Myanmar

Wat Si Saket in Laos: The museum of thousands of Buddhist statues in various sizes

When you plan a trip to visit the land of the million elephants this festive seasons, it would be a pity if you missed a chance to visit the unique temples with sacred Buddhist statues. Wat Si Saket, located in the heart of Vientiane, is a great choice. Built by Chao Anouvong King – the last king of Lane Xang – Vientiane dynasty – in 1818, the temple boast the largest number of Buddhist statues in Laos. It is home to 6,840 statues made from different materials, including copper, stone, wood, silver, and plaster. The statues in Wat si saket temple in various sizes are set along corridors, surrounding the main temple. → Check our Laos Luxury Travel

There is also a nearly 400 year old library with a multitude of old Buddhist books hand written on palm leaves.

In Wat Si saket, every visitor spends time standing in a room in the left side the temple. This room is home to many statues damaged by war in Laos in the past. During the war, temples were looted and devastated. Many statues just have the body left, some lost hands, some lost legs, but most of them no longer have heads. When the war ended, the locals rebuilt the temples and statues. Si Saket is not only a temple to worship but a great place to learn about the culture and history of Laos.

Direction to Si Saket temple: Sethathirath street, open from 8 am to 4 pm, entrance fee: 5000 kip

Wat Si Saket in Laos: The museum of thousands of Buddhist statues in various sizes

Shwedagon: The masterpiece made from hundreds of tons of gold & thousands of diamonds

Covered in gold and adorned by thousands of diamonds and rubies, Shwedagon Pagoda in the former capital, Yangon is not only a sacred place for Buddhist but the most popular temple in Myanmar.

Shwedagon is covered in hundreds of tons of gold plates. The highest point of the tower is encrusted with 4531 diamonds, the largest one is 72 carat. Built about 2500 years ago, the temple is believed to keep the Buddhist treasures including the stick of kakusandha Buddha , the water filter of Konagamna Buddha, a piece of Kassapa Buddha’s outfilt and 8 strand of hair of Shakyamuni Buddha. Spanning an area of 50,000m on the top of singuttara hill, the temple allows visitors to admire the beauty of Yangon. All Buddhist towers are covered with gold, but the most attractive one is the main tower. In the evening, the Shwedagon temple is lit up with neon lights standing out in the city’s sky. If you have a chance to visit and worship at this temple, don’t forget to visit the Buddhist towers, sculptures, and shrines around the main tower.

Note to the visitors: Wear decent outfits, long pants to cover your knees and long sleeved tops. Sleeveless shirt, legging, and such are not accepted / take off your shoes before entering to the temple and shrines. You should bring a bag to hold your shoes. Do not make noise and do not turn your back to the Buddha

Opening time: every day from 4 am to 10 pm – Entrance fee US$8

Shwedagon: The masterpiece made from hundreds of tons of gold & thousands of diamonds

Angkor Wat temples: Bow to the heritage site of thousands of years

Spend a few days visiting Angkor wat temples when you have a chance to travel to Cambodia. Situated on the outskirts of Siem Reap, it is the symbol of country and the peak of ancient Khmer architecture. Traditionaly Angkor Wat is not considered a temple but it is a holy place for Khmers (Cambodian peoples). Angkor wat is a complex os shrines and is the largest religious monument in the world and was recognized by UNESCO as a world cultural heritage in 1992.

Although there are only remnants left, contemplating Angkor Wat in sunset , touching to Banteai Srei exquisite bas-reliefs, and walking on the main hall are great experiences for you to travel back to the golden period of the mighty empire that built such a majestic and sophisticated temple complex. Nowadays, traveler opt for an itinerary that allow them a visit to the majestic temple complex, do not miss the chance to stay a few day to visit the jungle covered temples to the deepest. The highlights include Bayon shrine with 54 stone sculpted towers with statue of Avalokitesvara on four sides is a must-explore place in the complex. → Book a vacation that includes Cambodia Luxury Tours

The entire Angkor Wat was built from large stones pieced together. Bas reliefs and patterns based on ancient stories following the two famous epics – Mahabharata and Ramayana – were added, representing the silks of ancient Khmers. Angkor Wat temples is a voluminous work consisting of five towers. You can conquer the lofty tower by eight stairs up to the sky. Chipped stairs share the traces of centuries.

Opening time: 5.30 am to 5.30 pm entrance fee to Angkor Wat US$37 from Feb 2017

Angkor Wat temples: Bow to the heritage site of thousands of years